Which Cottage News

Archive for February, 2012

Often know as the Enchanted Island, Colonsay is one of the most beautiful Hebridean islands. It is small in size yet has a great variety from ancient and cultivated woodlands to peat bogs and raised beaches and tidal flats. The island of Colonsay is situated west of Oban between Mull and Islay and is accessible by ferry. It has outstanding views across the sound of Jura. Colonsay is known for its white sandy beaches on both coasts with its perfect coves that are ideal for swimming. You might even spot seals and otters on the offshore reefs. The birdlife is also extensive from the magnificent golden eagle and peregrine falcons to the corncrake. Colonsay also has a unique rough golf course which is cropped by cattle and sheep so challenging and fun at the same time! There is freshwater fishing on an inland loch and excellent sailing and kayaking. Despite the small size of this beautiful island, there is a book shop/publishing house and a brewery on the island. The shop is excellent and should you want the chance to let someone else do the cooking, there is a tea shop and a stylish hotel and restaurant. The neighbouring island of Oransay is worth a visit. It is linked by a tidal causeway. There you can explore the ancient priory. This is also the location of some of the best oysters. The pace of life is delightfully slow and  a paradise for cyclists, including children, as there is very little traffic and drivers are very…

Glenelg village is a collection of largely white-painted properties set around Glenelg Bay which has stunning views west across the Kyle Rhea to the mountains of eastern Skye. Glenelg has long been the gateway to Skye until the road from Inverness reached Kyle of Lochalsh in 1819. Today there is still a seasonal Glenelg ferry that carries a few cars across the water. The local area is reknowned for its spectacular scenery from Loch Hourn and Britain’s last great wilderness Knoydart, to the legendary hikers’ challenge of the Five Sisters of Kintail. Glenelg itself has the beautiful The Glenelg Inn which serves delicious food, and stunning accommodation. There is also a shop and post office in the village. Any budding historians will enjoy a visit to the Bernera Barracks, just to the north of Glenelg. They were built in the aftermath of the 1715 Jacobite uprising the Government and were completed in 1723. The barracks can be viewed at reasonably close quarters, but are fenced off for safety reasons. If you want to explore Glenelg and the surrounding area for longer, have look at Creagan Mhor, an outstanding self-catering property just a mile from the village of Glenelg. This renovated church manse stands proudly at the top of the Sound of Sleite The house looks down the Sound with breathtaking views of Skye, Gavin Maxwell’s Sandaig, Eigg, Rhum and Ardnamurchan point. There are outstanding vistas from every window in the property. Set in nearly an acre of garden, there is a path that leads you straight onto…